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Nathaniel Newlin, Sr.

Male 1665 - 1729  (63 years)


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  • Name Nathaniel Newlin  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Suffix Sr. 
    Born 18 Dec 1665  Mountmellick Mtg, Mountmellick, Leix, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    AFN 77WP-W2 
    Died 17 Apr 1729  Concord, Chester Co, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Concord Mtg Burial Ground, Concordville, Delaware Co, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I2185  default
    Last Modified 1 Feb 2007 

    Father Nicholas Newlin,   b. 1619, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1699  (Age 80 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth,   d. 1719 
    Family ID F10428  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Mary Mendenhall,   b. 1670, Mildenhall, Ramsbury, Wiltshire Co, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Oct 1728, East Caln, Chester Co, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years) 
    Married 17 Feb 1685  Concord Friends Meeting, Concord, Chester Co, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [6, 7, 8
    Notes 
    Married:
    • MARRIAGE: Ancestral File lists marriageplace as "Concords Friends Meeting, Concordville, Delaware, Pennsylvania."
    Children 
     1. Jemima Newlin,   b. 19 Dec 1685, Concord, Chester Co, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1723, Thornburg, Chester Co, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 37 years)
     2. Elizabeth Newlin,   b. 3 Mar 1687, Concord, Chester Co, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Mar 1723, Kennett, Chester Co, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 36 years)
     3. Nicholas Newlin,   b. 19 May 1689, Concordville, Chester Co, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Mar 1768, Concord, Chester Co, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
    +4. Nathaniel Newlin, Jr.,   b. 19 Mar 1690, Concord, Chester Co, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Feb 1732, Concord, Chester Co, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 41 years)
    +5. John Newlin,   b. 28 Feb 1691, Concord, Chester Co, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Feb 1753, Concord, Chester Co, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years)
     6. Keziah Newlin,   b. 22 Feb 1696, Concord, Chester Co, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     7. Mary Newlin,   b. 12 Apr 1697, Concord, Chester Co, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 13 Apr 2007 
    Family ID F857  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Concord Meeting [26 Mar 2006]
    Concord Meeting [26 Mar 2006]
    Photo of Concord Meeting at Concordville, Pennsylvania, originally established in 1686. Concord Meeting was an important part in the Mendenhall and Woodward family history. Richard Woodward Jr married his first two wives (Esther DAVIS, Deborah STANFIELD) in 1695 and 1701. John Mendenhall Sr married his second wife, Esther MADDOCK Dix, at this meeting in 1708. Aaron Mendenhall Sr married his first wife, Rose PIERSON here in 1715. Taken by Chad G. Nichols

    Documents
    Intent to Marry [13 Feb 1685]
    Intent to Marry [13 Feb 1685]
    Intent to Marry of Nathaniel Newlin & Mary MENDENHALL at the Chichester Monthly Meeting; Due to the calendaring system it is possible the date is incorrect
    Marriage Record [17 Feb 1685]
    Marriage Record [17 Feb 1685]
    Marriage record of Nathaniel Newlin, Sr., & Mary Mendenhall at Concord Friends Meeting, Concord, Chester, Pennsylvania

    Headstones
    Unmarked Grave
    Unmarked Grave
    Burial Marker
    Burial Marker
    Burial Marker of Nichols Newlin and son, Nathaniel Newlin Sr at Concord Meeting Burial Ground

    Histories
    History
    History
    "The 17th Century Mendenhalls in Concord, Pennsylvania." Source is Smith's, "History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania." Transcription and minor editions by Chad G. Nichols.

  • Notes 
    • DEATH: Ancestral File lists "Concordville, Delaware, Pennsylvania" as deathplace.

  • Sources 
    1. [S756] Nichols Online Library, Digital Documents Researched and Scanned by Chad Nichols & Relatives, Nichols, Chad G., (Catalogue of over 40,000 relatives with more than 5,000 of them having documentation to support their place in the family tree. Some recent generation surnames include Anderson, Broman, Campbell, Cloward, Conder, Dutson, Ericksen, Farmer, Holyoak, Kump, Kylen, Mendenhall, Nichols, Nielson, O'Donnell, Richardson, Roberts, Shelley, Stone, and Walker. Most ancestors are from England, Denmark, Sweden, and Germany. [online] www.nicholslibrary.org 7783 S 4950 W West Jordan, UT 84081 USA) (Reliability: 3).
      Concord Mtg - 003441; Concord Mtg Burial Ground - 003442; Intent to Marry - 002458; Marriage Record - 001282; History - 001033; Burial Marker - 003452

    2. [S34] Mendenhall Family Association (MFA), ([online] : http://www.mendenhall.org) (Reliability: 3).
      Nathaniel was the son of Nicholas and Elizabeth (Paggott) Newlin. He came from Ireland with his father. They settled in Concord, PA in 1683, coming from a Friends Meeting in Queens County, Ireland. Most of the Quakers from Ireland were English and had not lived in Ireland for more than one or two generations.
      In 1687, the County Court of Chester made Nathaniel the constable for Concord for the ensuing year. He did jury service on several occasions, and more than once was foreman of the grand jury. In 1693, Nathaniel was taken to court for not providing fitting clothing for one of his servants and was ordered to buy a new hat, coat, waistcoat, pair of breeches and drawers, a pair of stockings and shoes for his servant.
      During the period 1696-1699, Nathaniel served on a committee to establish a meeting house for the Quakers in Middletown township. Nathaniel served as one of the Commissioners of Property and in 1702 he helped satisfy the Ockanickon Indians by setting up a reservation for them in Chester County. The reservation consisted of 500 acres located in what became known as Willistown Township.
      In 1698 he was elected to his first term in the General Assembly of the Legislature of Pennsylvania. In this office he served thirteen terms, twenty-six years of legislative service to his province. In 1700, the Assembly named him as one member of a committee on governmental reorganization and law revision. He served at least five terms as a justice of the Chester County Court. For a short time he was one of the assessors for Chester County and was a trustee of the General Loan Office from 1723 to 1729. Nathaniel was on the first board of four members.
      Later he was appointed to be a judge of the Concord County courts. He served as justice of the peace, assessor and president of the Court of Common Pleas.
      Nathaniel's wealth resulted primarily from his land investments. In 1699 he received as an inheritance from his father, 250 acres of land in Concord as well as another 250 acres where he made his home. This land had originally been patented to his father by William Penn.
      In 1699, Nathaniel built for his family a large brick dwelling house on the land that he inherited. It was located about 1/4 mile west of his father's home. This house was used for over 150 years before being demolished.
      In 1701 he expanded his land holdings by 600 acres in an area known as Rockland Manor which later became part of the Concord township. This is one of the tracts in Concord which his father had bought as a five hundred acre tract on which he built his home and in 1696 built a saw mill.
      Nathaniel later built a grist mill and dam on the west branch of Chester Creek. Carved on a stone in the wall of the mill is, "Nathan and Mary Newlin 1704." In 1739, Nathaniel built a stone house for the miller, beside the mill. The original house consisted of two rooms upstairs and two rooms downstairs with a fireplace in each, with a beehive oven outside the kitchen fireplace. About 1810, a third story was added.
      The mill was in operation through several changes of owners and under various names until, as the Concord Flour Mill, it ground commercially for the last time in 1941. In 1957, after stints as a book shop and an antique store, it was purchased, along with the miller's house and the surrounding land, by E. Mortimer Newlin, eighth generation descendant of Nathaniel. The mill's great wooden cogs, gears and pinions were all in place but had rotted from disuse. The grist mill was reconstructed and now is part of a park and is open to visitors.
      As an adjunct to the mill, Nathaniel established a dry goods store at the mill site. It was the first general store in Concord. His inventory included kitchen utensils, tools, household goods, lumber, cloth and clothing. Nathaniel's greatest real estate venture came when he purchased from The Free Society of Traders, on 10 Jun 1724, for 800, a tract of land in the Brandywine Valley which contained 7,100 acres. Soon after making this purchase Nathaniel had it re-surveyed which revealed that he had actually purchased 7,700 acres. It was this huge rectangle of land that became Newlin Township in 1740. During the next three years he sold 1,300 acres in nine tracts for more than one half of what he paid for the entire 7,700 acres. Besides tripling the per acre sales price he also attached a quitrent of 1s per hundred acres to be paid to him in addition to that which was attached to the land before Nathaniel acquired it.
      The sale of this property caused a problem with the local Indians. The Indians claimed title to land one mile wide on each side of the Brandywine River, saying that William Penn had granted it to them, but that the deed had been lost in a fire in a cabin where it was kept. The deed apparently had not been recorded and no trace of it was ever found. In a effort to placate the Indians the Provincial Assembly at first attempted to nullify the sale of the land to Nathaniel, but he was too wily a businessman to be put out of a legitimate claim. Then the Assembly tried to compensate Nathaniel with other land on an acre for acre basis, but Nathaniel held out for land of a comparable value, since his land was among the choicest in the County. Eventually, Nathaniel worked out a settlement with the Indians and delivered it to the Provincial Assembly for their approval. What compensation Nathaniel received from the Commissioners of Property is not clear but both he and the Indians were well pleased with the settlement. In the heat of the long negotiations the Commissioners of Property seem to have lost their patience with Nathaniel and it is equally evident that the Assembly did, too. Both used rather strong language to describe his stand. If this was done with a view to bringing pressure to induce Nathaniel to change his mind the political skill of this veteran public servant must have been a match for them. Nathaniel's promise to the Indians was faithfully kept as long as he lived.
      Nathaniel married secondly, Mary Fincher in Apr 1729 and died the following month without a will. By inheritance and purchase he acquired a total of 8,452 acres and at the time of his death, his estate included 7,643 acres of land. An inventory of his estate valued it at 5926 2s and 1 pence.

    3. [S346] Family History Library Films, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (Salt Lake City, UT : [Online index]), FHL 432022 (Reliability: 3).
      Concord Friends Meeting Records, Concordville, Delaware, Pennsylvania

    4. [S218] Personal Research & Library, Raymond L. Maris, Maris, Raymond L., ([online] http://www.maris.net [email] raymond # maris.net, (change # to @)) (Reliability: 3).
      bur. London Grove, Chester Co, PA

    5. [S381] Grave Marker (Reliability: 3).
      NEAR THIS SPOT WERE BURIED
      NICHOLAS NEWLIN
      BORN 1619, DIED 1699; HE PURCHASED 7000 ACRES OF LAND IN
      PENNSYLVANIA AND EMIGRATED FROM MOUNT MELICK, COUNTY TYRONE,
      IRELAND, SETTLING IN CONCORD TOWNSHIP; HE WAS ONE OF THE
      FOUNDERS OF THIS MEETING; SERVED IN WILLIAM PENN'S
      PROVINCIAL COUNCIL, 1685-89; SAT AS A JUSTICE IN THE
      COURTS AT CHESTER, 1685-91; ELIZABETH NEWLIN, HIS WIFE,
      DIED 1719, PROMINENT IN THIS MEETING; THEIR SON,
      NATHANIEL NEWLIN
      BORN IN IRELAND, 1665, DIED 1729; A MEMBER OF THIS MEETING;
      SERVED IN THE ASSEMBLY OF THE PROVINCE DURING FOURTEEN
      SESSIONS, 1698-1722; SAT AS A JUSTICE IN THE COURTS AT
      CHESTER AT VARIOUS TERMS, 1703-26;
      FOUNDER OF NEWLIN TOWNSHIP ON THE BRANDYWINE, 1724;
      AND HIS WIFE, MARY MENDENHALL NEWLIN, WHO CAME FROM
      WILTSHIRE, ENGLAND, WITH HER BROTHERS, JOINED THIS MEETING
      AND WAS HERE MARRIED, IN 1685.
      --------
      THIS MARKER WAS PLACED HERE IN 1916 AS A RECORD BY THEIR DESCENDANTS, LEWIS PALMER AND WILLIAM C. SPROUL.
      Photo & transcription by Chad G. Nichols

    6. [S31] Marriage Announcement Source Media Type: Card (Reliability: 3).
      At a monthly meeting held at Chichester the 13th of the 2on m 1685 Nathaniel Nulin And Mary Mendinghall declareth their intention of marriage the second time to each other the meeting being satisfied as in Respect to their Claruos(?) has Left to them freedom to proseed according to the good order of truth.
      Photo & transcription by Chad G. Nichols 6 Jan 2006

    7. [S110] Early Church Records of Delaware County, Pennsylvania, Volume 2, Peden, Henry C., Jr. M.A. & Launey, John Pitts, (Westminster, Maryland : Willow Bend Books, 199?), P 1 (Reliability: 3).
      Nathaniel Newlin, yeoman, and Mary Mendenhall, spinster, both of Concrd, m. 17th of 2nd mo, 1685 at the house of Nicholas Newlin in Concord

    8. [S411] Marriage Certificate or Record (Reliability: 3).
      Whereas Nathaniel Newlin, yeoman, and Mary Mendenhall, spinster, both of the township of Concord in the county of Chester in the province of Pennsylvania having declared their intentions of taking each other as husband and wife before several public meetings of the people of God called Quakers according to the good order used amongst them, those proceedings therein after deliberate consideration thereof and consent of parties and relations concerned being approved by the said meetings.
      Now these are to certify all whom it may concern that for the full determination of their said intentions this seventeenth day of the second month called April in the year one thousand six hundred eighty five they the said Nathaniel Newlin and Mary Mendenhall appeared in a public and solemn assembly set together for that end and purpose at the house of Nicholas Newlin in Concord aforesaid according to the example of the holy men of God recorded in the scripture of truth, he the said Nathaniel Newlin, taking the said Mary Mendenhall by the hand did openly declare as followeth viz:
      I, Nathaniel Newlin, do in the presence of God and you, his people, take Mary Mendenhall to be my wife, promising to be to her a faithful husband until death separate us and then and there in the said assembly the said Mary Mendenhall did in like manner declare as followeth, viz:
      I, Mary Mendenhall, in the presence of God and you, his people, take Nathaniel Newlin to be my husband promising to be to him a faithful wife until death separate us and the said Nathaniel Newlin and Mary Mendenhall as a further confirmation thereof did then and there to these presents set their hands.
      Nathaniel Newlin (signed) Mary Newlin (signed).
      Transcription by Mendenhall Family Association (MFA). Mary and Nathaniel were married at the home of Nathaniel's father. The couple had declared their marriage intentions at the two previous sessions of Chichester Monthly Meeting.